Gochujang Yangnyum

A teaspoon Gochujang Yangnyum over Dasima and cabbage rolls.

Kombu is the Japanese word for dried sea kelp and Dasima in Korean and seaweed including dried sea kelp is widely consumed in Korea.

This dish is a favourite picnic and party food  and you can taste at moderately expensive Korean traditional restaurants. If you want to impress your friends or party guests then this is the dish that you can make in a short time but it is a healthy and delicious vegan dish.

Gochujang is fermented chilli paste and Koreans often add some vegetable or cooked and chopped meat or seafood to make the sauce rich, less salty and taste to take another level of taste.

You can use this sauce for bibimbap sauce as well as stir fry.

If this sauce is spicy then add some tomato puree, for mine added 2 Tablespoons.

Preparation time: 30 minutes

cooking time: 30 minutes

Serves: 4 people

Ingredients

You will need to buy Gochujang from a Korean supermarket or Amazon

For the marinade (Gochujang sauce)

  • ¼ cup finely chopped carrots, onions, yellow peppers, leeks
  • ¼ cup Gochujang, Korean chilli paste
  • 4 tsp tomato puree (optional)
  • 2 tsp grated garlic, toasted sesame seeds, chia seeds
  • 1tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 4 tsp runny honey
  • ¼ tsp white pepper
  • 145g canned tuna

For the rice

  • 300g cooked rice
  • 1tsp sesame oil, toasted sesame seeds, chia seeds

For the vegetable

  • 5-8 leaves of cabbage
  • 2-3 piece of Dasima(Kombu)
  1. Drain the tuna in a strainer in the sink. Make sure to break up the chunks of tuna.
  2. Mix all the Gochujang ingredients and put them aside or keep it in a jar.
  3. For the vegetables, if the Dasima is thick then boil it for 2 -3 minutes, if the Dasima is thin then just soak in cold water for 20 minutes. When finished, dry out with kitchen towel. Place 2-3 layers of cabbage leaves on a microwave-safe plate for 40 seconds.
  4. Prepare cooked rice then add sesame oil, sesame seeds, chia seeds and a tiny pinch salt then mix them well. Put aside and cover with a lid or cling film.
  5. Spread a portion of rice covering ¼ of the cabbage leaf and just roll forward, pressing gently and tightly with a mat. When the roll is complete, press inwards at both open ends and wrap with cling film.
  6. Repeat with Dasima too.
  7. Leave for 20-30 minutes, before removing the cling film and slicing to serve.
  8. Scoop your Gochujang sauce on top of the cabbage & Dasima rolls.

Genius Soy Sauce

1.Guk-Ganjang 

mixture ) and brine. The mixture of meju (freshly boiled and mashed soyben) is left for 2-3 months outside in the cold winter months in Korea until the liquid becomes black. The taste is richer and saltier, also the colour is much lighter than regular soy sauce.

How to use them

This is for seasoning soup, boiled vegetable called Namul and salads called Muchim .

2. Jin Ganjang (a mix of chemically produced soy sauce)

This mass produced  soy sauce is called Ganjang, Whe-Ganjang or Jin-Ganjang : It is similar to the soy sauce you see on every supermarket shelf

How to use them

They make a great marinade or can be splashed into stews or used in sauces for meat and vegetables such as, stir-frying, braising, marinating and grilling or dipping sauce.

3. Mat Ganjang or Jorim Ganjang  (flavoured or seasoned soy sauce)

This  is the most commonly used in Korean dishes. It is much less salty compared to regular or Guk Ganjang. This is regular sauce diluted  and boiled with  some vegetable and some dry fish and starch syrup or sugar added. It is easy to use in any Korean dishes for seasoning.

4. Sempio soy sauce for soup base (soba)  

There are many flavoured Soy sauces for cold noodles or Japanese soba. This Sempio brand which I got from a Korean supermarket in the UK  worked well  for my Genius Soy Sauce. Japanese Tsuyu Soba sauce is similar.

To make Genius soy sauce  What you need to buy is

Mat Ganjang 맛 간장 or Jorim Ganjang 조림 간장 (flavoured or seasoned soy sauce) and add Korean Sempio soy sauce for soup base 

You can use this sauce for  salad , in bibimbap, with pan-fried fish, pancake or as dipping sauce for spring rolls.

Why is soy sauce black when soybeans are not? In making soy sauce, protein from soybeans breaks down into amino acids. This reaction results in a black coloured substance.